I will always have fond memories of Mary Alyce. The two years that we taught together in Porterville are fond memories. I often think about the two of you teaching me how to play bridge so there would be a foursome with Gordon, and all the times we played tennis. Many, many fun times with the two of you.

Jack Cottrell

 

I sat next to Mary Alyce for many years when I attended Mass at Newman Hall. We did not know each other well, but we enjoyed the spirit of the place together. I will always remember her warm smile, lovely voice, and her genuine blessing to those around her during the "Peace Be With You." She was radiant and I feel blessed to have spent the time with her there. May peace be You now as you say good bye to your beautiful, mother, wife, and friend.

Margaret Golden

 

Like everyone I'm sorry to hear you lost Mary Alyce. I have several vivid images of her beginning in our graduate school days. The first image is in your apartment and the picture some friends lent you of the eyes peering under the window shade where there was an inscription something like, "You're being watched!" I always think of her as being the one most responsible for changing my vote in 1964 for Barry Goldwater to a vote in 1968 for Hubert Humphrey. She always had a gentle, persuasive way with words. Another image is from the ski trips to the Upper Michigan Peninsula. I can see the two of you dancing at The Hunter's Inn with your somewhat wild gyrations complimented by her rhythmic moves to the music. But more vivid than the dancing is an image of her practicing her parallel skiing at Indian Head Ski Area I think she saw the same PBS series on skiing I saw where you were to traverse a modest slope and jump and set the edges of the skis. She was doing exactly what the video showed. I remember her concentration on the exercise. She always is a special prize. I am sorry for your loss, but think you fortunate to have so many years together. I hope our paths can cross soon. Peace, love, joy.

Ed Paradis

 

Please accept my condolences on the loss of Mary Alyce. I have a few words to share about our times as high school students at Paly and since. I got to know Mary Alyce when we were both high-school juniors in a European History class, taught be one of the best teachers you can imagine—Florence Turner. Miss Turner challenged us to understand history by tackling, in writing, key topics, for example, "The Unification, Break-up, and Reunification of Germany" and "The Formation of the State of Israel." Instead of asking students to respond individually, she encouraged collaboration. Mary Alyce and I decided to be partners in researching and writing about these topics. She and I spent countless after-school hours, sitting at a card table pitched in my parents' living room, learning about and preparing these important subjects for subsequent essay exams. It was then that I became aware of her splendid intellect and warm, winning personality. Mary Alyce also became part of the Rohrs family women's retail clothing business. After my father met Mary Alyce at our home, he offered her an after-school and summer job. I think both he and she were pleased with the arrangement, and she collected some funds for her college education. Another connection was between Mary Alyce's and my mother. Both were avid sports fans, who eagerly followed and discussed teams. We three (my parents and I) were all honored to be guests at Mary Alyce's and David's wedding. After that, careers and geography separated us for decades. When Mary Alyce and David returned to the Bay Area, we reconnected. I enjoyed sharing an interest in literary writing with Mary Alyce, and I visited with her several times at Judy Warren's annual ladies' lunch. During one of those lunches, Mary Alyce told me how glad she was to have married David. He had been and was, she said, a wonderful partner for her. I followed from a distance Mary Alyce's gradual decline, which included the loving care you three provided for her. I know you will treasure innumerable family memories and honor her legacy.

Patricia Rohrs